434.924.9333
Patient & Visitor Information

434.924.9333

Cancer Center
Cancers We Treat

See All Cancers We Treat

Need a Second Opinion?

If you'd like to schedule an appointment for a second opinion, call 434.924.9333.

  

Need a Second Opinion?

If you'd like to schedule an appointment for a second opinion, call 434.924.9333.

Questions?

If you need to speak with someone about your appointment, call 434.924.9333.

Construction Update: Temporary Sidewalk Closure

  

Make an Appointment

If you'd like to make an appointment or get a second opinion, call 434.924.9333.

Google Search Cancer
Home > Patient Care > Screening Programs > Prostate Cancer Screening

Prostate Cancer Screening

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 220,800 American men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2015, resulting in an estimated 27,540 deaths. 

The second leading cause of death from cancer in men, prostate cancer occurs more often in African-American men than in white men. African-American men with prostate cancer are more likely to die from the disease than white men with prostate cancer.

It is important to be screened if you have any of the risk factors below or if you are 50 years or older (40 years or older for African American men). UVA offers free prostate screenings every September. For more information, call 434.924.9561.

Risk Factors

It is possible to develop prostate cancer with or without the risk factors listed below. However, the more risk factors you have, the greater your likelihood of developing prostate cancer. If you have a number of risk factors, ask your doctor what you can do to reduce your risk.

Age

After 50 years old, the risk of developing prostate cancer increases. However, the majority of prostate cancers are seen in men over age 65.

Race and Ethnicity

In the US, African Americans have higher rates of developing prostate cancer. They are also more likely than Caucasian men to die from prostate cancer.

High-Fat Diet    

Good nutrition is essential for health and well-being. Studies have found an association between diets high in fat and an increased risk of prostate cancer.

Lack of Exercise  

Living a sedentary lifestyle may put you at greater risk for prostate cancer, while studies have found that exercising regularly may reduce your risk of prostate cancer.

Family History   

Having a father or brother with prostate cancer increases your risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Chemical Exposure   

Exposure to an herbicide known as Agent Orange has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. You may have been exposed to this herbicide if you served in the armed forces, especially during the Vietnam War when the herbicide was used to clear vegetation.